Tim McMahon, Editor of UnemploymentData.com

My grandfather lived through the Hyperinflation in Weimar, Germany--to say he was an original “gold bug” would be an understatement. I began reading his “hard money” newsletters at the age of 16 and the dividends from gold stocks helped put me through college. I began publishing the Financial Trend Forecaster paper newsletter in 1995 upon the death of James Moore editor of Your Window into the Future and the creator of the Moore Inflation Predictor©. FTF specializes in trends in the stock market, gold, inflation and bonds. In January of 2003, I began publishing InflationData.com to specialize in all forms of information about the nature of Inflation. In 2009, we added Elliott Wave University to help teach you the principles of Elliott Wave analysis. In January 2013, we began publishing OptioMoney. Connect with Tim on Google+.

45 Ways You Can Find Success Without a Degree

College degrees are expensive these days. Many college graduates wind up with five-figure debts and still no job prospects once they graduate. To avoid that, many people are now looking for jobs that don’t require a degree. While some may assume that these are low-paying jobs, many are not. If you’re looking for a job that doesn’t require a degree, you might want to consider “Trade School” or other possibilities. They pay well and best of all, they require no 4 year degree.

Deciding Which Engineering Degree is Right for You

If you think you’d like to become an engineer but aren’t sure which program is right for you there are several factors that you should consider. Often High School graduates only think about how much money they can earn and forget that there is much more to a job than that. You don’t want to spend the next 30 -40 years doing something you don’t enjoy so it is important to look at what the job entails and the environment it is done in. Some engineers spend a lot of time in the field on a job site… others spend their time in an office. Some work with their hands while others work on computers or with chemicals. And finally you have to consider job availability no matter how much you enjoy designing horse saddles if there isn’t much demand for horse saddle engineers you probably won’t be able to find a job doing it.

May Employment and Unemployment Numbers

The U.S.Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released the May unemployment numbers today. The BLS Commissioner says: Nonfarm payroll employment increased by 138,000 in May, but these are Seasonally Adjusted numbers. So since typically employment increases in May, what he is saying is that 138,000 more jobs than average were created. In unadjusted terms employment was 145.938 […]

5 Ways You Can Build Your Professional Skillset with Certifications

In a competitive job market, making your resume stand out from the crowd could be as simple as earning a certificate or two by passing a few exams. This can serve as verification of special skills and training. Many certifications will be recognized and respected by hiring managers. This can give you an instant advantage over […]

Tips for Coping with Unemployment

Unemployment is tough, not only are there financial repercussions, but there are psychological ones as well. But it is important to act quickly to minimize the negative impact on both yourself and anyone who is depending on you.

Only 25% Intend to Retire at Retirement Age

Every two years Gallup does a survey and asks working age adults if they intend to retire once they reach “full retirement age”. This is the age set by the Social Security department for when you qualify for retirement benefits. In years past this was 65 years old, but in an effort to salvage the Social Security system they extended the age. If you were born in 1937 or earlier full retirement age is still 65 but if you were born in 1960 or later full retirement age is 67. And in between, full retirement age gradually increases from 65 to 67. See the Social Security Administration’s Benefit By Year Of Birth chart.

Over a Million New Jobs Not 211,000 

Today’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Commissioner’s Report says, “Nonfarm payroll employment increased by 211,000 in April, and the unemployment rate, at 4.4 percent, was little changed. Thus far this year, monthly job gains have averaged 185,000, in line with average monthly job growth in 2016. In April, job gains occurred in leisure and hospitality, health care and social assistance, financial activities, and mining.”
But we have to remember that typically employment increases in April. So what the BLS Commissioner is saying is that 211,000 more jobs than average were created. In layman’s terms, unadjusted employment was 144.953 million in March and 145.979 in April for a net gain of 1,026,000 jobs.

Why the U.S. Isn’t at “Full Employment” Yet

BLS posted good employment news and the NY Times and WSJ started talking about “Full Employment” but are we really that close? Probably not!

Don’t Let Your Social Security Claim Be Denied

What to do if you need to apply for social security disability or retirement benefits. In some cases, these claims are denied. To avoid a social security claim denial, be sure to follow the application instructions closely.

Unemployment Down in March

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released their monthly Employment/Unemployment report for the month ending in March on April 7th. The widely publicized Seasonally Adjusted U-3 Unemployment rate was 4.5% down from 4.7% in February. While the broader U-6 unemployment rate that includes discouraged workers and other “marginally attached” individuals was 8.9% down from 9.5% in February.

The BLS’ Unadjusted U-3 was 4.6% in March down from 4.9% in February. The Gallup alternatives presented mixed results with Gallup’s Unadjusted U-3 at 5.7% up from 5.5% in February while Gallup’s version of the U-6 was unchanged at 13.7%.