Only 25% Intend to Retire at Retirement Age

Every two years Gallup does a survey and asks working age adults if they intend to retire once they reach “full retirement age”. This is the age set by the Social Security department for when you qualify for retirement benefits. In years past this was 65 years old, but in an effort to salvage the Social Security system they extended the age. If you were born in 1937 or earlier full retirement age is still 65 but if you were born in 1960 or later full retirement age is 67. And in between, full retirement age gradually increases from 65 to 67. See the Social Security Administration’s Benefit By Year Of Birth chart.

Don’t Let Your Social Security Claim Be Denied

What to do if you need to apply for social security disability or retirement benefits. In some cases, these claims are denied. To avoid a social security claim denial, be sure to follow the application instructions closely.

Social Security Benefits: Planning for Your Future

Social Security is the common name for the United States federal government’s Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI). The program guarantees the nation’s most vulnerable citizens can depend on a minimum sustenance and care support. Taxpayers fund Social Security through payroll taxes, self-employment contributions, and IRS investment of these funds into special government trusts. The Social Security Cost of Living Act (COLA) guarantees increases in benefits amounts to account for inflation but in recent years the official inflation rate has been low enough that they have not given Cost of Living increases. Americans become eligible to draw Social Security benefits when they reach age 62 but depending on the year you were born you may not get full benefits until you are 67 (or older). To ensure you will receive your full Social Security benefits when the time comes, you need to begin planning for your future now. The following measures can help you plan for and protect your benefits.